Oklahoma City Duplex – Progress Update

After months of searching for homes that fit my criteria, I finally closed on my first property in Oklahoma City on December 10, 2020. I plan to BRRRR (Buy, Rehab, Rent, Refinance, Repeat) this property, which is currently in the rehab phase as of February 2021. Below, I’ve provided an update on the property itself, rehab progress (spoiler alert: this one is slow-going), and what I have learned so far.  

The Property and How I Found It

The property is a 1300 square foot, 2 bedroom 2 bathroom duplex located in the growing Northwest side of Oklahoma City. My agent, Abbie Davis, actually presented this property to me while it was off-market.  Abbie and her husband own a property management company called The Property Center in OKC, and one of their clients reached out to Abbie saying he wanted to sell this property for $100,000. His property was already rented for $695 per side per month with solid tenants. Thankfully, Abbie reached out to me after recognizing that this property would be a great fit for my OKC strategy. 

Here are the numbers as we estimated them before putting the property under contract:

Purchase Price: $100,000

After Repair Value (conservative estimate): $156,000

Repairs (mostly cosmetic): $20,000

Time required to make repairs: 3 months

Total Monthly Rent: $1450 total (both sides plus pet fees). Once repairs are complete, property would rent for $1650-1850 total

As mentioned, the property was already rented out and cash-flowing, and since the repairs were mostly cosmetic and on the exterior of the property, we felt confident that we could keep the tenants in place while making the repairs. 

After we put the property under contract at the seller’s asking price, we proceeded with a  thorough inspection. The inspector confirmed that the repair costs would be very close to our original estimate of $20,000. I’ve always heard that rehabs regularly go over budget and take longer to complete than you think, so I made a mental note estimating the rehab would be closer to $25,000 and would take 3 months. 

The Northwest side of OKC is very hot right now! The heart marks the duplex

How I Funded the Deal 

I had finally found the property – now, I needed to come up with $100,000 cash to buy it. Thankfully, I had already been telling friends and family about what I was doing in Oklahoma City and sharing my journey via Instagram (@honorandequity), so I had a few different people already expressing interest in lending money to the LLC. My sister-in-law reached out and said she would 100% be on board lending the money. I contacted a real estate attorney in Oklahoma City to help draw up the contract and promissory note to make it all legitimate. She wired the money directly to the title company in time for closing and that was it! Honor and Equity’s first OKC property was in the books. 

My sister-in-law also agreed to fund the rehab (which we estimated at $20,000-$25,000) and we worked that verbiage into the contract. I felt pretty confident the rehab would go over $20,000, and I decided I would just fund any additional repairs out of my own pocket. 

The Molasses Rehab

If you want to get started on a rehab immediately after closing on a property, don’t buy it right before the Christmas holidays in the middle of a worldwide pandemic! The rehab, already moving like molasses, was slowed down even more by the coldest weather Oklahoma City has seen in over 100 years!

Before I get into the rehab specifics, I want to say that I’ve been working with some fantastic people at The Property Center. This is the property management company I use, and they have been kind enough to let me work directly with their folks who handle the maintenance coordination for the properties they manage. Paul and Sally at TPC have been the project managers on this rehab, including scheduling estimates, coordinating dates and times of the estimates with the tenants, and providing me progress updates, pictures, and confirmation that the work has been completed. As an out-of-state investor, I would not be able to do this strategy without great people like this to help me out! 

In order to figure out the must-do items of the rehab, I reached out to my local insurance agent Shane Jones at State Farm in Oklahoma City. He looked over the inspection report and told me which items I would have to fix in order for State Farm to insure the property. I passed this info along to Paul and Sally at TPC. I then chatted with Paul, Abbie Davis, and Eli Davis to determine what cosmetic repairs to make. We sent that info out to a few different companies to provide estimates and decided on a handyman company they had worked with before.

Here’s a list of most of the repairs:

-New porch decking and handrails

-Exterior Fascia and Trim

-New Windows

-Paint exterior of home, including new fascia, window trim, and porch

-New kitchen tile

-Remove overgrown vegetation

-Install new front door on one unit

-Faucet repairs in bathroom

-New Gutter system

New Fascia and Trim were installed on the exterior of the property

A single company has done a majority of the work, whereas the windows will be completed by a window specialist, and the gutter system will be completed by a separate company as well. 

When we got the first estimate for the window repair, the company told us it would be a 6-week delay at a MINIMUM to get the windows delivered. This was due to the COVID pandemic affecting worldwide supply chains, especially for home improvement items. I’m guessing this is because lots of people have been improving their homes over the last year, and many of these supplies come from China. 

To make matters even worse, in February Oklahoma City saw some extremely cold weather. Because of this, they couldn’t work on the paint and they couldn’t install the gutters until the weather got back above freezing. The city saw below-freezing temps for about 2 total weeks! 

Now that temperatures are back to normal in OKC, we’re making more progress. The biggest delay now is the windows, which still haven’t arrived. Once the windows are installed, the handyman company will update the trim and paint around the windows and most of the work will be complete by that time. We will do a final walkthrough to address minor issues, and then we’ll be on to the appraisal and refinance portion of the BRRRR process.

The new porch being installed!

Lessons Learned So Far

  1. You must have fantastic people on your team! I already knew this one, but the process so far has just reinforced it. If I did not have Paul and Sally at TPC to help project manage this, I would be in a real bind. Also, Abbie and Eli have been extremely helpful with advice on what work to do and what not to do, based on the condition of the home and the neighborhood. 
  1. The rehab will take longer than you think! Thankfully, I had always heard this on BiggerPockets episodes so I knew to expect it – and it is definitely true. The holidays, combined with COVID, compounded by super cold weather have caused the project to take at least twice as long as it would have otherwise. Typically, these longer rehab times would really annoy an investor like myself since I’m paying high-interest rates, but the money is going to my sister-in-law! So the longer the rehab goes, the more money she makes and at least we’re keeping it in the family!
  1. Take Action! Investing from out of state can be stressful. I’m not able to personally see these properties before putting in offers. I’m not able to evaluate all of these contractors in person, and I’m not able to personally inspect the work. This would paralyze many people into inaction. You have to trust your team and accept that you will make mistakes along the way. It’s much better to take action, make a mistake, learn from it, and move on than to be completely paralyzed and do nothing. Successful people take massive action!

I hope you enjoyed this article. Please share your thoughts and questions in the comments below, and make sure you follow @honorandequity on Instagram! Feel free to email me directly at doug@honorandequity.com

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